Irish Piano

Well, I’m in Joplin, MO for St. Patrick’s Day, but I wanted to post a little Irish piano lesson on my blog, so I fired up my smart phone and put this together for you.

Not the highest production values in the world, and I hadn’t had my hair done yet, but hopefully you can use these couple of tips today or tomorrow, or whenever you want to make some Irish sounds on the piano.

If you’d like to learn a simple, but beautiful arrangement of Danny Boy, be sure to check out my Danny Boy Video Piano Lesson (with a very special price before midnight, Sunday, March 17th, 2013) here:

http://pianochordsfast.com/dannyboy.html

Enjoy.

Printable Free Piano Chord Chart

printable piano chord chartLooking for a free piano chord chart? Look no further! I’ve created a chart that shows you the proper piano keys to play to create all the basic major, minor, seventh, augmented, and diminished chords. And you DON’T have to read music to use it! This chart will be an invaluable tool for you to refer to while working your way through lead sheets, guitar books, or chord progressions you find on the internet.

Just click the link below to get your free piano chord chart – AND free video piano chord lessons – no strings attached.

Click here to download your free chord chart.

I hope you enjoy your free chord chart – no one should be without one!

 

Beatles Piano Chords: Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da

The Beatles’ “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” is a great little song to learn on the piano, and it’s one I often play for my very first song of the evening at a piano bar. It gets everyone clapping and singing, and it’s an easy, fun little song.

iTunes & App Store

The piano chords for “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” are very simple, so to celebrate the release of all The Beatles’ music on iTunes this week, I decided to post this little video lesson and show you how to play this classic Beatles song on the piano for yourself.

Yes, this blog post has been a long time coming, since I’ve been busy with my Improvise Piano… FAST! online video course lately (among other things), so I wanted to make it up to you with this free lesson.

Be sure to check out The Beatles on iTunes, if you haven’t already, and enjoy this free video piano lesson on “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”!

Easy Rock And Roll Piano Lesson Video

Well, it took me long enough, but in response to some comments and emails about my last blog post on rock and roll piano, I decided to put together a video showing the basics of good ol’ rock and roll piano.

This lesson covers some simple left-hand bass and right-hand chord patterns that will fit with such classic tunes as “Johnny B. Goode,” “Great Balls of Fire,” and “Old Time Rock and Roll,” to name just a few.

If you like this rock and roll piano lesson, or if you have any questions or other input, please leave your comments below and, if you like it, please use the ReTweet button or the share link to share with your friends.

Without further adieu, let’s rock and roll on the piano…

If you’d like to get this lesson on DVD AND see it applied to 3 GREAT classic rock and roll songs – Johnny B. Goode, Great Balls of Fire, and Old Time Rock and Roll, CLICK HERE TO CHECK IT OUT.

Rock And Roll Piano Lesson – Classic, Fast, And Easy!

In this lesson, we’re going to talk about rock and roll piano – well, I guess I should say rock ‘n’ roll, to be official.

This will hopefully be a very simple lesson for you, because rock and roll piano uses some very simple structures.

Before we do anything, here’s a picture of the piano keys and note names for your reference. This pattern repeats up and down the piano, so the note names remain the same – they just make higher or lower sounds.

Piano Note Names

First, let’s talk about the chord progression.

The most standard progression is based on the “12-bar blues” progression:

(4 bars of I) + (2 bars of IV) + (2 bars of I) + (1 bar of V7) + (1 bar of IV) + (2 bars of I)

If you’ll recall from some of my other lessons, the roman numerals correspond to chords based on scale tones. Capital numbers are major chords, and the number corresponds to the scale tone of the chord root.

For example, in the key of C:

I = C major = C-E-G
IV = F major = F-A-C
V7 = G7 = G-B-D-F

Now, let’s talk about each hand separately, then we’ll put them together for the finale, OK?

For the left hand, I suggest starting with one of the following two bass lines:

1-6-5-6

or

1-3-5-6

OK, so what does THAT mean?!

Well, those numbers represent notes in the major scale in whatever key you’re playing.

For example, in the key of C, a C major scale is:

C D E F G A B C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

So, those two bass lines become:

C A G A (moving DOWN from C to A and A to G, then back up to C)

or

C E G A (moving UP the entire time)

For a song that’s “in 4” (4/4 tempo – 4 beats to a measure), simply play this pattern over and over in your left hand.

Got it?

Now, for the right hand…

The easiest thing to play would be the following pattern, depending on the chord being played:

Alternate these two chords over and over for the “C major” portion of the progression:

C-E-G
C-F-A

Each chord should be played at the same time as the left hand. In other words, both hands press the piano keys at the same time:

LH RH
— —
C C-E-G
E C-F-A
G C-E-G
A C-F-A

(This is actually a nice little 2-hand practice pattern)

For the “IV” part of the progression – let’s stick with the key of C for this – play the following 2 chords:

F-A-C
F-Bb-D

while the left hand plays the same pattern as before, but beginning on F:

F-D-C-D

or

F-A-C-D

Finally, for the “V7” portion of the progression, the left hand portion is:

G-E-D-E

or

G-B-D-E

and the right-hand chords are:

G-B-D
G-C-E

The rhythmic pattern is the same throughout this entire progression – simply apply the appropriate chord and bass pattern to each section to build the following chord progression for each measure of 4 beats:

C – C – C – C – F – F – C – C – G7 – F – C – C

It’s kind of like putting together the pieces of a puzzle. In fact, that’s exactly how I think of it when I learn a new tune.

And if you’d like to dive in a little deeper, you might want to check out my Rock and Roll Piano… FAST online/DVD video piano course.

Hope that helps you rock a little harder, or at least easier 😉

How To Use Patterns To Improve Your Piano Playing FAST!

Patterns are an integral part of the piano – the whole keyboard is built upon a single series of 12 keys, and piano sheet music naturally involves a number of patterns – both melodic (single notes) and harmonic (multiple notes).

In this video lesson, I’ll show you how you can use some very simple patterns to improve your piano playing FAST. They may take just a little practice, but once you learn these and start creating your own, I think you’ll begin to see the power of piano patterns.

If you have any comments, suggestions, or other feedback about this lesson, please leave a comment below!

Thanks.